estate planning

Can We Retire Early?

Happy Labor Day!

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Speaking of labor, we kick off the holiday edition of the show with Michael from New York who at age 47 is looking to retire within the next four years, if not sooner! Early retirement has certainly been a running theme throughout 2019.

Next up was Steve from Cleveland who is unfortunately dealing with the sudden loss of his father and trying to help his mother navigate her finances now that everything is unexpectedly on her plate.

More emails in hour two. We’ll start mixing in some interviews by mid-September.

Enjoy the long weekend!

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"Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.

Having the Money Talk with Your Parents

As your parents age, you may find that you want or need to broach the often-difficult subject of finances. 

In Mom and Dad, We Need to Talk: How to Have Essential Conversations with Your Parents About Their Finances, personal finance journalist Cameron Huddleston lays out the best ways to approach this issue, along with a wealth of financial and legal information that will help you help your parents into and through their golden years.

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Sometimes parents are reluctant to address money matters with their adult children, and topics such as long-term care, retirement savings (or lack thereof), and end-of-life planning can be particularly touchy. 

In this book, you’ll hear from others in similar positions who have successfully had “the talk” with their parents, and you’ll read about a variety of conversation strategies that can make talking finances more comfortable and more productive.

  • Learn conversation starters and strategies to open the lines of communication about your parents’ finances

  • Discover the essential financial and legal information you should gather from your parents to be prepared for the future

  • Gain insight from others’ stories of successfully talking money with aging parents

  • Gather the courage, hope, and motivation you need to broach difficult subjects such as care facilities and end-of-life plans

Although talking money with your parents can be hard, you aren’t alone, and this book will guide you through the process of having fruitful financial conversations that lead to meaningful action.

Have a money question? Email me here.

Please leave us a rating or review in Apple Podcasts.

Connect with me at these places for all my content:

https://www.jillonmoney.com/
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"Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.

CBS This Morning: Estate Planning

Failing to have a will is one of the biggest errors you can make. Fifty-eight percent of American adults have not prepared estate planning documents, according to Caring.com. CBS This Morning spoke to a Massachusetts woman who could lose the home she has lived in for most of her life because her step-father did not leave a will.

Have a money question? Email me here.

A New Beginning, Annuities and Estate Planning 101

I don’t know what it is, but for the last six weeks or so, it sure feels like we’re getting nonstop annuity questions.

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And it continues this week as we start the show with Jane from Arkansas who decided to give us a call after her “advisor” suggested she put $35,000, minimum, into a fixed annuity.

Next was Stephanie from Nevada, who after the passing of her husband, is beginning a new chapter in life. With considerable assets in hand, for once it was nice to hear that Stephanie actually got what sounds like solid advice from some reps at her local bank.

Michael Jackson, Prince, Aretha Franklin…these three amazing and wildly successful musicians did not have a will. How could that be, you ask? Don’t they have agents, lawyers and accountants? Didn’t they know at some point they were going to die? “That’s irresponsible,” you say, but welcome to the real world, where even famous people can’t seem to get their acts together to address this difficult topic head on.

According to a Caring.com survey, only 42 percent of U.S. adults currently have estate planning documents, including a will. Shockingly, for those with children under the age of 18, the figure is even lower, with just 36 percent having an end-of-life plan in place. Of those who have not done any estate planning, 47 percent said, “I just haven’t gotten around to it.”

I get it…contemplating one’s death is not exactly high on anybody’s to-do list, but it is important that you overcome the anxieties associated with this emotional topic and take control.

So that’s why today we’re doing an estate planning bootcamp with Russell Fishkind, an attorney with Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr.

If you are ready to finally begin or revisit the planning process and seek the guidance of a qualified estate attorney (yes, you should pay up for a lawyer and not do it yourself), here are the basic documents to consider:

  • Will: A document that ensures that assets are passed to designated beneficiaries, in accordance with your wishes. In the drafting process, you name an executor, the person or institution that oversees the distribution of your assets. If you have minor children, you need to name a guardian for them.

  • Letter of Instruction: This may contain appointment of someone who will ensure for the proper disposition of your remains, creepy, but important if you are choosing a method that is contrary to your family’s tradition.

  • Power of Attorney: Appointment of someone to act as your agent in a variety of circumstances, like withdrawing money from a bank, responding to a tax inquiry or making a trade.

  • Health Care Proxy: Appointment of someone to make healthcare decisions on your behalf if you lose the ability to do so.

  • Trusts: Revocable (changeable) or irrevocable (not-changeable) trusts may be useful, depending on family and tax situations. For 2018, the first $11.2 million of an estate is exempt from federal estate taxes. If an estate is above the threshold (or twice that for married couples), you may want to consider a trust.

Have a money question? Email me here.

Connect with me at these places for all my content:

https://twitter.com/jillonmoney

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http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/jill-... 

https://apple.co/2pmVi50

"Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.

Annuities, Medicare and Social Security

This week we’re starting things off with Annamarie in Pennsylvania, who at 63, is planning on retiring in the next few years. She was recently approached by her financial advisor about placing her current 401(k) into an annuity. Good idea or bad?

Next up was Susan from Tennessee who is trying to navigate things after the unexpected passing of her sister. Named as executor of the will, Susan understandably has a lot of questions.

In hour two we brought back Steve Vernon, an old pal of mine from my CBS MoneyWatch days.

Steve joined us to talk about Medicare open enrollment as well as answer some of your Social Security questions.

With Medicare's open enrollment period running through December 7, you have a golden opportunity to make changes that might better serve you in the years to come.  

Many people assume that because Medicare is called "medical insurance," it's similar to their employer's medical insurance that protected them during their working years. But that's wrong.

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Employer-sponsored health care plans typically have one set of deductibles and copayments, and you only need to pay one premium to obtain comprehensive coverage. Not so with Medicare – it's much more complicated than that. Traditional Medicare has three different parts that cover hospital, outpatient, and prescription drugs – called Parts A, B, and D, respectively. Each part has its own set of premiums, deductibles and copayments. 

As a result of having these three different parts, many retirees mistakenly assume hat Medicare provides all the coverage they need. Or they think they're healthy and won't need additional insurance coverage beyond Medicare. Then they're shocked when they experience their first significant medical claim and are forced to pay thousands of dollars out-of-pocket. 

You can guard against these surprises by purchasing either a Medicare Supplement Plan (aka Medigap) or Medicare Advantage Plan. These plans are both designed to reduce Medicare's significant gaps. By one estimate, millions of retirees make the mistake of not purchasing such a plan to help close Medicare's gaps. 

Have a money question? Email me here.

Connect with me at these places for all my content:

https://twitter.com/jillonmoney

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https://www.linkedin.com/in/jillonmoney/ 

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/jill-... 

https://apple.co/2pmVi50

"Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.

Estate Planning Done Right

Michael Jackson, Prince, Aretha Franklin…these three amazing and wildly successful musicians did not have a will. How could that be, you ask? Don’t they have agents, lawyers and accountants? Didn’t they know at some point they were going to die? “That’s irresponsible,” you say, but welcome to the real world, where even famous people can’t seem to get their acts together to address this difficult topic head on.

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According to a Caring.com survey, only 42 percent of U.S. adults currently have estate planning documents, including a will. Shockingly, for those with children under the age of 18, the figure is even lower, with just 36 percent having an end-of-life plan in place. Of those who have not done any estate planning, 47 percent said, “I just haven’t gotten around to it.”

I get it…contemplating one’s death is not exactly high on anybody’s to-do list, but it is important that you overcome the anxieties associated with this emotional topic and take control.

So that’s why today we’re doing an estate planning bootcamp with Russell Fishkind, an attorney with Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr.

If you are ready to finally begin or revisit the planning process and seek the guidance of a qualified estate attorney (yes, you should pay up for a lawyer and not do it yourself), here are the basic documents to consider:

  • Will: A document that ensures that assets are passed to designated beneficiaries, in accordance with your wishes. In the drafting process, you name an executor, the person or institution that oversees the distribution of your assets. If you have minor children, you need to name a guardian for them.

  • Letter of Instruction: This may contain appointment of someone who will ensure for the proper disposition of your remains, creepy, but important if you are choosing a method that is contrary to your family’s tradition.

  • Power of Attorney: Appointment of someone to act as your agent in a variety of circumstances, like withdrawing money from a bank, responding to a tax inquiry or making a trade.

  • Health Care Proxy: Appointment of someone to make healthcare decisions on your behalf if you lose the ability to do so.

  • Trusts: Revocable (changeable) or irrevocable (not-changeable) trusts may be useful, depending on family and tax situations. For 2018, the first $11.2 million of an estate is exempt from federal estate taxes. If an estate is above the threshold (or twice that for married couples), you may want to consider a trust.

“Better Off” is sponsored by Betterment.

Have a money question? Email us here or call 855-411-JILL.

We love feedback so please subscribe and leave us a rating or review in Apple Podcasts!

Connect with me at these places for all my content:

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https://www.linkedin.com/in/jillonmoney/ 

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/jill-... 

https://apple.co/2pmVi50

We STILL Avoid Estate Planning

We STILL Avoid Estate Planning

Michael Jackson, Prince, Aretha Franklin…these three amazing and wildly successful musicians did not have a will. How could that be, you ask? Don’t they have agents, lawyers and accountants? Didn’t they know at some point they were going to die? “That’s irresponsible,” you say, but welcome to the real world, where even famous people can’t seem to get their acts together to address this difficult topic head on.

Planning After a Sudden Loss

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We can do all the planning we want in life, but sometimes things just happen, including the sudden loss of a loved one. That's the case with Steve from Cleveland who is trying to navigate things after the loss of his father.

“Better Off” is sponsored by Betterment.

Have a money question? Email us here or call 855-411-JILL.

We love feedback so please subscribe and leave us a rating or review in Apple Podcasts!

Connect with me at these places for all my content:

https://twitter.com/jillonmoney

https://www.facebook.com/JillonMoney

https://www.instagram.com/jillonmoney/

https://www.linkedin.com/in/jillonmoney/ 

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/jill-... 

https://apple.co/2pmVi50