financial aid

Making College Work at Any Cost

The struggle to pay for college is one of the defining features of middle-class life in America today. At kitchen tables all across the country, parents agonize over whether to burden their children with loans or to sacrifice their own financial security by taking out a second mortgage or draining their retirement savings. 

Indebted: How Families Make College Work at Any Cost, takes readers into the homes of middle-class families throughout the nation to reveal the hidden consequences of student debt and the ways that financing college has transformed family life.

Caitlin Zaloom gained the confidence of numerous parents and their college-age children, who talked candidly with her about stressful and intensely personal financial matters that are usually kept private. 

Throughout the book, Zaloom describes the profound moral conflicts for parents as they try to honor what they see as their highest parental duty, providing their children with opportunity, and shows how parents and students alike are forced to take on enormous debts and gamble on an investment that might not pay off. 

What emerges is a troubling portrait of an American middle class fettered by the “student finance complex,” the bewildering labyrinth of government-sponsored institutions, profit-seeking firms, and university offices that collect information on household earnings and assets, assess family needs, and decide who is eligible for aid and who is not.

Indebted breaks through the culture of silence surrounding the student debt crisis, revealing the unspoken costs of sending our kids to college.

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"Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.

CBS This Morning: FAFSA Season

Tuesday marks the first day you can apply for college financial aid for the next school year. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, determines grants, loans and work study money for more than 12 million students. I joined CBS This Morning to discuss why even those who don't think they will qualify for aid should still apply.

College Financing 2019

College Financing 2019

Impeachment! Brexit! Trade Talks! There’s a lot to take in, and no, you shouldn’t try to game out how any of these events will impact your investments, because these is no precedent for the conditions that exist. Instead of going back in time to recreate what could happen, your time would be better spent focusing on an area that is within your control: the college financing process.

Is Grad School Worth It?

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Is grad school worth it? Given the amount of loans that are killing students, I often say no way! But it's not always the case, as you'll hear on the latest call with Trevor from Cleveland.

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"Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.

The Weight of College Financing

The Weight of College Financing

When I talk about funding college, I proffer the usual advice: Build your family’s financial foundation (pay down debt, establish an emergency reserve fund, and maximize retirement plan contributions) BEFORE trying to tackle college funding; talk to your kid as early as freshman year in high school about what the family can afford; and don’t shortchange your own or your child’s financial future by amassing mounds of debt.

Should We Be Saving for College?

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Great conversation on this episode with Jenny from Washington state who is wondering if she and her husband should be putting aside any college money for their baby son.

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"Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.

Prepping for Retirement

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We start the show with Linda from New Jersey who is wondering how she should be investing money once retired but still before she starts receiving Social Security. Great question!

Next up was Bob from the Bay Area with another retirement question regarding Social Security and his overall asset allocation.

In hour two we’ve got David Klein and Kelly Peeler from CommonBond, a company that positions itself as a place for simpler, smarter student loans for a brighter future.

While taking out loans for business school, co-founder David found himself asking a lot of questions: Why is the process so confusing? Why is the customer service so bad? Why are the interest rates so high? Isn’t there a better way for people to borrow for school?

Turns out he wasn’t alone as figures now show that students in the U.S. are struggling to pay down over $1.5 trillion in debt.

CommonBond was founded in 2012 to help relieve that burden, and since then have funded over $2.5 billion in better student loans. Their approach is no big secret: lower rates, simpler options, and a world class experience, all built to support you throughout your student loan journey.

Kelly and David firmly believe that student loans should be for fulfilling your dreams, not emptying your bank account. They’re helping you get there by lowering the cost of school and simplifying the process with no more stressful applications or being treated like an account number.

Have a money question? Email me here.

Please leave us a rating or review in Apple Podcasts.

Connect with me at these places for all my content:

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"Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.

How to Pay for College?

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It's the million dollar question: How on earth are we going to pay for college? That's the dilemma facing Camelia in Colorado as her son prepares to leave for school in August.

Have a money question? Email me here.

Please leave us a rating or review in Apple Podcasts.

Connect with me at these places for all my content:

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https://apple.co/2pmVi50

"Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.

CBS This Morning: Student Loan Scams

In this week's Eye On Money, we are focusing on the growing number of student loan scams. As many families deal with college financing this summer, the Better Business Bureau reports an increase in fraudulent texts, emails and voicemails about loans. I joined CBS This Morning with what families need to know to avoid these scams.

Financial Independence

Financial Independence

While many were enjoying an extended break last week, there was good news and bad news on the financial independence front. For the economy, independence from a Federal Reserve rate cut proved to be the right course of action, at least for now.