New York Times

How to Win in a Winner-Take-All World

Every ambitious professional is trying to navigate a perilous global economy to do work that is lucrative and satisfying, but some find success while others struggle to get by. In an era of remarkable economic change, how should you navigate your career to increase your chances of landing not only on your feet, but ahead of those around you?

In How to Win in a Winner-Take-All World, Neil Irwin, senior economic correspondent at the New York Times, delivers the essential guide to being successful in today’s economy when the very notion of the “job” is shifting and the corporate landscape has become dominated by global firms. 

Irwin shows that the route to success lies in cultivating the ability to bring multiple specialties together, to become a “glue person” who can ensure people with radically different technical skills work together effectively, and how a winding career path makes you better prepared for today's fast-changing world. 

Using insights from global giants like Microsoft, Walmart, and Goldman Sachs, and from smaller lesser known organizations, How to Win in a Winner-Take-All World illuminates what it really takes to be on top in this world of technological complexity and global competition.

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"Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.

Real Estate + The Financial Crisis Ten Years Later

Saving for retirement while also trying to save for a house downpayment. That’s the dilemma facing Erin from Salt Lake City as we kicked off the latest radio show. Is there a happy medium? Or should she focus all her efforts on getting that downpayment in place?

Next up was Joe from Chicago with another real estate question. This one involves finding a way to keep an piece of existing property in the family.

Where has the time gone? It was ten years ago this month that the U.S. financial system was brought to its knees.

To help us retrace the events of that period, we’re joined today by Gretchen Morgenson, investigative reporter at the Wall Street Journal.

As the financial crisis was unfolding, Morgenson was working for the New York Times, and subsequently co-authored Reckless Endangerment: How Outsized Ambition, Greed, and Corruption Led to Economic Armageddon.

There’s no one more qualified to walk us down memory lane and remind us of just how bad things actually were. In case you’ve forgotten, consider this timeline:

  • 9/15/2008: Lehman Brothers files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. On the same day, Bank of America announced its intent to purchase Merrill Lynch for $50 billion.

  • 9/16/2008: The Federal Reserve Board authorized the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to lend up to $85 billion to AIG under Section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act.

  • 9/16/2008: The net asset value of shares in the Reserve Primary Money Fund fell below $1 per share, primarily due to losses on Lehman Brothers commercial paper and medium-term notes. When the Reserve fund “broke the buck,” it caused panic among investors who considered money market accounts nearly the equivalent of bank savings accounts.

  • 9/19/2008: To guard against a run on money market funds, the Treasury Department announced that it would insure up to $50 billion in money-market fund investments at companies that paid a fee to participate in the program. The year long initiative guaranteed that the funds' values would not fall below the $1 a share.

  • 9/20/2008: The Treasury Department submitted draft legislation to Congress for authority to purchase troubled assets (the first version of TARP).

  • 9/21/2008: The Federal Reserve Board approved applications of investment banking companies Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley to become bank holding companies.

All this in just one week!! An incredible moment in the history of this country, and it was only ten years ago.

Have a money question? Email me here.

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"Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.

The Financial Crisis Ten Years Later

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Where has the time gone? It was ten years ago this week that the U.S. financial system was brought to its knees.

To help us retrace the events of that period, we’re joined today by Gretchen Morgenson, investigative reporter at the Wall Street Journal.

As the financial crisis was unfolding, Morgenson was working for the New York Times, and subsequently co-authored Reckless Endangerment: How Outsized Ambition, Greed, and Corruption Led to Economic Armageddon.

There’s no one more qualified to walk us down memory lane and remind us of just how bad things actually were. In case you’ve forgotten, consider this timeline:

  • 9/15/2008: Lehman Brothers files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. On the same day, Bank of America announced its intent to purchase Merrill Lynch for $50 billion.
  • 9/16/2008: The Federal Reserve Board authorized the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to lend up to $85 billion to AIG under Section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act.
  • 9/16/2008: The net asset value of shares in the Reserve Primary Money Fund fell below $1 per share, primarily due to losses on Lehman Brothers commercial paper and medium-term notes. When the Reserve fund “broke the buck,” it caused panic among investors who considered money market accounts nearly the equivalent of bank savings accounts.
  • 9/19/2008: To guard against a run on money market funds, the Treasury Department announced that it would insure up to $50 billion in money-market fund investments at companies that paid a fee to participate in the program. The year long initiative guaranteed that the funds' values would not fall below the $1 a share.
  • 9/20/2008: The Treasury Department submitted draft legislation to Congress for authority to purchase troubled assets (the first version of TARP).
  • 9/21/2008: The Federal Reserve Board approved applications of investment banking companies Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley to become bank holding companies.

All this in just one week!! An incredible moment in the history of this country, and it was only ten years ago.

“Better Off” is sponsored by Betterment.

Have a money question? Email us here or call 855-411-JILL.

We love feedback so please subscribe and leave us a rating or review in Apple Podcasts!

Connect with me at these places for all my content:

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Do I Need This Annuity + Your Money with Ron Lieber

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Why is my advisor trying to get me to buy an annuity? Such a common question on this show, and that's how we kicked things off this week with John from Colorado. Even though John is in great shape with several million saved, that doesn't mean he automatically needs an annuity. Such an interesting call! 

As someone who consumes a massive amount of financial data and then tries to make it palpable to listeners, viewers and readers, I am drawn to those who have an uncanny ability to break through the clutter.

At the New York Times, my-go to writer for personal finance is Ron Lieber. His column, the wildly popular Your Money, covers just about anything and everything that hits you in the wallet, from investing to paying for college to mortgages and homes.

And that pretty much describes how our discussion went. We bounced around -- from Equifax to the cost of college and the fiduciary debate.

Ron is also an accomplished author. His most recent book is The Opposite of Spoiled: Raising Kids Who Are Grounded, Generous, and Smart About Money.

His latest book project, What To Pay For College, is set to be released in 2020 and will ask college presidents questions that families don’t know (or are afraid) to ask, as well as putting the surprisingly small amount of existing data on this topic into context and pulling the curtain back on how schools set prices which can now top $125,000 for four years of tuition, room and board for state residents.

It’s always a blast to talk shop and the state of the financial services industry with a colleague, especially when it’s somebody you so highly respect.

Have a money question? Email me here.

Connect with me at these places for all my content:

https://twitter.com/jillonmoney

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https://www.linkedin.com/in/jillonmoney/ 

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/jill-... 

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"Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.

A Vanguard Retirement Plan & Whole Life Insurance

Happy Memorial Day weekend! Please, please take a moment or two sometime this weekend to remember all those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice while serving our country. Without them, none of it is possible. 

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We started the show this week with Dennis from Minnesota who is planning on retiring next year and is in the process of putting the finishing touches on his retirement plan and wanted to run it by us. 

Next up was John from Connecticut who is being pitched a whole life insurance policy by his financial advisor. Is such a policy in the best interest of John? Should he buy it? Or pass? 

Next up, you guessed it, we wrapped up the hour by answering a handful of emails. 

“I’m just bad with money!” I know that many have convinced themselves that they were born with a recessive money management gene, but financial planning can be learned, like anything else. That's the message of This Is the Year I Put My Financial Life in Order. In a book that is part financial memoir and part research-based guide to attaining lifelong security, New York Times reporter John Schwartz bares his financial soul.

Schwartz and his wife, Jeanne, are upper middle class earners, who have been on a financial rollercoaster. Sharing his own alternately harrowing and hilarious stories, from his brush with financial ruin and bankruptcy in his thirties to his short-lived budgeted diet of cafeteria food, John will walk you through his own journey to financial literacy, which he admittedly started a bit late.

He covers everything from investments to retirement and insurance to wills (at fifty-eight, he didn't have one!), medical directives and more. Whether you're a college grad wanting to start out on the right foot or you're approaching retirement age and still wondering what a 401(K) is, this book will help you find your financial way.

So if you are like the countless others who are a bit tentative when it comes to money matters, but are willing to learn before it's too late, this book should help improve your financial literacy.

Have a money question? Email us here or call 855-411-JILL.

Connect with me at these places for all my content:

https://twitter.com/jillonmoney

https://www.facebook.com/JillonMoney

https://www.instagram.com/jillonmoney/

https://www.linkedin.com/in/jillonmoney/ 

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/jill-... 

https://apple.co/2pmVi50

"Jill on Money" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.

Your Money with Ron Lieber

As someone who consumes a massive amount of financial data and then tries to make it palpable to listeners, viewers and readers, I am drawn to those who have an uncanny ability to break through the clutter.

At the New York Times, my-go to writer for personal finance is Ron Lieber. His column, the wildly popular Your Money, covers just about anything and everything that hits you in the wallet, from investing to paying for college to mortgages and homes.

pf 101.jpg

And that pretty much describes how our discussion went. We bounced around -- from Equifax and Wells Fargo to the cost of college and the fiduciary debate.

Ron is also an accomplished author. His most recent book is The Opposite of Spoiled: Raising Kids Who Are Grounded, Generous, and Smart About Money.

His latest book project, What To Pay For College, is set to be released in 2020 and will ask college presidents questions that families don’t know (or are afraid) to ask, as well as putting the surprisingly small amount of existing data on this topic into context and pulling the curtain back on how schools set prices which can now top $125,000 for four years of tuition, room and board for state residents.

It’s always a blast to talk shop and the state of the financial services industry with a colleague, especially when it’s somebody you so highly respect.

“Better Off” is sponsored by Betterment.

Have a money question? Email us here or call 855-411-JILL.

We love feedback so please subscribe and leave us a rating or review in Apple Podcasts!

Connect with me at these places for all my content:

https://twitter.com/jillonmoney

https://www.facebook.com/JillonMoney

https://www.instagram.com/jillonmoney/

https://www.linkedin.com/in/jillonmoney/ 

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/jill-... 

https://apple.co/2pmVi50

"Better Off" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.

The Year I Put My Financial Life in Order

“I’m just bad with money!” I know that many have convinced themselves that they were born with a recessive money management gene, but financial planning can be learned, like anything else. That's the message of This Is the Year I Put My Financial Life in Order. In a book that is part financial memoir and part research-based guide to attaining lifelong security, New York Times reporter John Schwartz bares his financial soul.

Schwartz and his wife, Jeanne, are upper middle class earners, who have been on a financial rollercoaster. Sharing his own alternately harrowing and hilarious stories, from his brush with financial ruin and bankruptcy in his thirties to his short-lived budgeted diet of cafeteria food, John will walk you through his own journey to financial literacy, which he admittedly started a bit late.

He covers everything from investments to retirement and insurance to wills (at fifty-eight, he didn't have one!), medical directives and more. Whether you're a college grad wanting to start out on the right foot or you're approaching retirement age and still wondering what a 401(K) is, this book will help you find your financial way.

So if you are like the countless others who are a bit tentative when it comes to money matters, but are willing to learn before it's too late, this book should help improve your financial literacy.

“Better Off” is sponsored by Betterment.

Have a money question? Email us here or call 855-411-JILL.

We love feedback so please subscribe and leave us a rating or review in Apple Podcasts!

Connect with me at these places for all my content:

https://twitter.com/jillonmoney

https://www.facebook.com/JillonMoney

https://www.instagram.com/jillonmoney/

https://www.linkedin.com/in/jillonmoney/ 

http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/jill-... 

https://apple.co/2pmVi50

"Better Off" theme music is by Joel Goodman, www.joelgoodman.com.