interest rates

More Market Milestones and Fed Do-Overs

More Market Milestones and Fed Do-Overs

Dow 27K! S&P 500 3K! NASDAQ 8200! Just months after the bull market in stocks and the current expansion each became the longest on record, U.S. equity indexes reached more milestones last week. Sure, the economy is expanding, but you can thank one person for the recent leg up in the bull market rally: Fed Chairman Jerome Powell.

Financial Independence

Financial Independence

While many were enjoying an extended break last week, there was good news and bad news on the financial independence front. For the economy, independence from a Federal Reserve rate cut proved to be the right course of action, at least for now.

Inside the Fed’s Head

Inside the Fed’s Head

Amid renewed Presidential criticism and evidence of a slowing economy, Fed officials will convene a two-day policy meeting this week and the pressure is on. As always, central bankers have to balance maintaining a strong enough economy to foster job growth, but it can’t run too hot, which might trigger inflation. Right now, there’s a battle brewing inside the collective Fed’s Head between action and inaction.

Solid Jobs Report Justifies Powell’s Case

Solid Jobs Report Justifies Powell’s Case

The government reported that the economy added a better than expected 263,000 jobs in April. It was the 103rd straight month of job growth, the longest streak on record. Nearly ten years into the expansion, job creation is 205,000 for the first four months of 2019, just above the monthly amount added since the labor market bottomed out in 2010.

Inversions V2.0

Inversions V2.0

Three different producers contacted me about the following headline, which appeared last week in the Wall Street Journal: “Inverted Yield Curve Is Telling Investors What They Already Know.” You may be forgiven for that case of déjà vu, because we last discussed the inverted yield curve in December. Here’s a refresher from my post on the topic:

CBS This Morning: Spring Housing Market

Last week, the Federal Reserve decided not to raise interest rates. The more dovish Fed outlook pushed down interest rates, which led mortgage rates to 14-month lows. The current 30-year fixed rate loan stands at just under 4.3 percent, just in time for the spring home buying season. I joined CBS This Morning to discuss.

Have a money question? Email me here.

Will Dovish Federal Reserve Boost Housing?

Will Dovish Federal Reserve Boost Housing?

Last week, the Federal Reserve decided not to raise interest rates. The more dovish Fed outlook pushed down interest rates, which led mortgage rates to 14-month lows. The current 30-year fixed rate loan stands at just under 4.3 percent, just in time for the spring home buying season.

CBS This Morning: How Does the Rate Hike Impact You?

Short-term interest rates are higher after the Fed raised rates Wednesday by a quarter point, to a range of 2.25 percent to 2.5 percent. It's the fourth rise this year and the highest level since 2008. The Dow closed down almost 352 points after the announcement, the lowest close of the year. How does the rate rise impact Americans? I discussed on CBS This Morning.

Have a money question? Email me here.